Mandombe script

Mandombe

Type

Alphabet organized into syllabic blocks

Languages
Kikongo, Lingala, Tshiluba, Swahili

Creator
Wabeladio Payi

Time period

1978–present

Parent systems

Artificial script

Mandombe

This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters.

A Mandombe book

Mandombe or Mandombé is a script proposed in 1978 in Mbanza-Ngungu in the Bas-Congo province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo by Wabeladio Payi, who related that it was revealed to him by Simon Kimbangu, the prophet of the Kimbanguist Church, in a dream. It is based on the sacred shapes and , and intended for writing African languages such as the four national languages of the Congo, Kikongo, Lingala, Tshiluba and Swahili, though it does not have enough vowels to write Lingala fully. It is taught in Kimbanguist church schools in Angola, the Republic of the Congo, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is also promoted by the Kimbanguist Centre de l’Écriture Négro-Africaine (CENA). The Mandombe Academy at CENA is currently working on transcribing other African languages in the script.[1] It has been classified as the third most viable indigenous script of recent indigenous African scripts, behind only the Vai syllabary and the N’Ko alphabet.[2]
A preliminary proposal has been made to include this script in the combined character encoding ISO 10646/Unicode.[3] A revised Unicode proposal was written in February 2016 by Andrij Rovenchak, Helma Pasch, Charles Riley, and Nandefo Robert Wazi.

Contents

1 Structure
2 Vowels
3 Consonants groups and families

3.1 Examples

4 Complex characters

4.1 Examples of complex syllables

5 Digits
6 Punctuation
7 See also
8 External links
9 References

Structure[edit]
Mandombe has consonant letters and vowel letters which are combined into syllabic blocks, rather like hangul. All letters are based on a square S or 5 shape. The six vowels are distinguished by numerals added to the right of the 5-shape. The consonants fall into four ‘groups’, or shapes, which are distinguished by adding a short stroke to the 5-shape for three of the groups; and into four ‘families’, or orientations, which are distinguished by reflecting and rotating the letter shapes. The four families of consonants are attached to the same corner of the vowel, which is reflected or rotated to match the consonant, so that the consonant r

Siedlec, Bochnia County

For other places with the same name, see Siedlec.

Siedlec

Village

School

Siedlec

Coordinates: 49°57′N 20°19′E / 49.950°N 20.317°E / 49.950; 20.317

Country
 Poland

Voivodeship
Lesser Poland

County
Bochnia

Gmina
Gmina Bochnia

Siedlec [ˈɕɛdlɛt͡s] is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Bochnia, within Bochnia County, Lesser Poland Voivodeship, in southern Poland. It lies approximately 10 kilometres (6 mi) south-west of Bochnia and 30 km (19 mi) south-east of the regional capital Kraków.[1]
References[edit]

^ “Central Statistical Office (GUS) – TERYT (National Register of Territorial Land Apportionment Journal)” (in Polish). 2008-06-01. 

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Siedlec, Bochnia County.

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Gmina Bochnia

Seat (not part of the gmina)

Bochnia

Villages

Baczków
Bessów
Bogucice
Brzeźnica
Buczyna
Cerekiew
Chełm
Cikowice
Dąbrowica
Damienice
Gawłów
Gierczyce
Gorzków
Grabina
Krzyżanowice
Łapczyca
Majkowice
Moszczenica
Nieprześnia
Nieszkowice Małe
Nieszkowice Wielkie
Ostrów Szlachecki
Pogwizdów
Proszówki
Siedlec
Słomka
Stanisławice
Stradomka
Wola Nieszkowska
Zatoka
Zawada

Coordinates: 49°57′N 20°19′E / 49.950°N 20.317°E / 49.950; 20.317

This Bochnia County location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Osowo Lęborskie railway station

Osowo Lęborskie

Location
Osowo Lęborskie, 
Poland

Owned by
Polskie Koleje Państwowe S.A.

Construction

Structure type
Yes (no longer used)

History

Previous names
Wussow (Kr. Lauenberg)
until 1945

Services

Preceding station
 
Railway lines of Poland
 
Following station

L. Dretowo
 
Line
 
Maszewo Lęb.

Osowo Lęborskie is a non-operational PKP railway station in Osowo Lęborskie (Pomeranian Voivodeship), Poland.
Lines crossing the station[edit]

Start station
End station
Line type

Lębork
Bytów
Closed

Resource[edit]

Osowo Lęborskie article at Polish Stations Database, URL accessed at 27 March 2006

This article about a Polish railway station is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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1898–99 Football League

The Football League

Season
1898–99

Champions
Aston Villa

Relegated
Blackpool
Darwen

← 1897–98
1899–1900 →

The 1898–1899 season was the eleventh season of The Football League. The race for the First Division title was one of the most exciting yet. Second-placed Liverpool travelled to Villa Park to face league leaders Aston Villa, needing a win to overhaul Villa and take the title on the last day of the season. Villa won 5-0 to take the title in emphatic style.
Defending champions Sheffield United had the first poor title defence in English top flight history, finishing 16th out of 18, barely avoiding the two relegation places.

Contents

1 Final league tables
2 First Division

2.1 Results
2.2 Maps

3 Second Division

3.1 Results
3.2 Maps

4 See also
5 References

Final league tables[edit]
The tables below are reproduced here in the exact form that they can be found at The Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation website[1] and in Rothmans Book of Football League Records 1888–89 to 1978–79,[2] with home and away statistics separated.
Beginning with the season 1894–95, clubs finishing level on points were separated according to goal average (goals scored divided by goals conceded), or more properly put, goal ratio. In case one or more teams had the same goal difference, this system favoured those teams who had scored fewer goals. The goal average system was eventually scrapped beginning with the 1976–77 season.
Since the goal average was used for this purpose for such a long time, it is presented in the tables below even for the seasons prior to 1894–95, and since the goal difference is a more informative piece of information for a modern reader than the goal average, the goal difference is added in this presentation after the goal average.
During the first five seasons of the league, that is until the season, 1893–94, re-election process concerned the clubs which finished in the bottom four of the league. From the 1894–95 season and until the 1920–21 season the re-election process was required of the clubs which finished in the bottom three of the league.[2]
First Division[edit]

Football League
First Division

Season
1898–99

Champions
Aston Villa
(4th English title)

Relegated
Bolton Wanderers
The Wednesday

FA Cup winners
Sheffield United (1st FA Cup title)

Matches played
306

Goals scored
868 (2.84 per match)

Top goalscorer
Steve Bloomer (Derby County), 23

Biggest home win
Derby County – The

Larry Williams (disambiguation)

Larry Williams (1935–1980) was an American rhythm and blues and rock and roll singer.
Larry Williams may also refer to:

Larry E. Williams, composer of “Let Your Love Flow”
Larry R. Williams (born 1942), publisher and promoter of trading ideas and father of actress Michelle Williams
Larry Williams (director), co-director of the TV movie Brave New World (1998 film)
Larry Williams (horn player), American horn player
Larry Williams (jazz musician), member of Seawind and keyboardist for Al Jarreau
Larry Williams, Jr. (born 1985), American football defensive back

See also[edit]

Laurie Williams (disambiguation)
Lawrence Williams (disambiguation)

This disambiguation page lists articles about people with the same name. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

List of Madlax characters

Madlax (マドラックス, Madorakkusu?) is a 26-episode anime television series that was produced in 2004 by the Bee Train animation studio. According to the composer of the series, Yuki Kajiura, the director Kōichi Mashimo created a list of brief descriptions of every recurring character for her to base their respective musical themes upon.[1] She refers to this list as “Mashimo Menu” and commented that the director’s descriptions provide deeper insight into the characters.[1]

Contents

1 Main characters

1.1 Margaret Burton
1.2 Madlax
1.3 Vanessa Rene
1.4 Elenore Baker
1.5 Friday Monday
1.6 Carrossea Doon
1.7 Limelda Jorg

2 Recurring characters

2.1 SSS
2.2 Quanzitta Marison
2.3 Nakhl
2.4 Laetitia
2.5 Poupée
2.6 Richard Burton

3 Minor characters

3.1 Pete Anyan
3.2 Badgis
3.3 Charlie
3.4 Chris Krana
3.5 Min Durk
3.6 Eric Gillain
3.7 Luciano
3.8 Guen McNichol
3.9 Maclay Marini
3.10 Anne Moré
3.11 Piederico Moré

4 References
5 External links

Main characters[edit]

Some of the central characters in the Madlax series.

Margaret Burton[edit]
Margaret Burton (マーガレット・バートン, Māgaretto Bāton?), born on 14 July 1992,[2] is a clumsy, absent-minded 19-year-old[2] girl who attends an elite college for aristocratic families’ children in Nafrece. Her memories of her own life are limited to its last twelve years, the word “Madlax”, and vague recollections of something important connected to an unusual “picture book” she possesses.
Margaret is ultimately the central character of the story,[3] as she is the person who has the Gift, a mysterious ability to alter the reality. Twelve years ago, she and the person who later became known as Carrossea Doon, survived a plane crash in Gazth-Sonika and interrupted the stand-off between Friday Monday, who unintentionally caused the accident while accessing the Sanctuary (see Terminology), and Colonel Richard Burton, Margaret’s father. Although Burton was victorious, Monday, with his last strength, chanted the Words of Awakening and put him into trance, forcing to shoot his own daughter. Protecting herself, Margaret shot her father and, to flee from the guilt, used her Gift to split herself into three personae: one who retained the Gift, one who took the sin of patricide upon herself, and one who kept the memories of this. Since that moment, the person known as Margaret Burton became but a third of her former self, still possessing the Gift, but having lost all memories.
The “picture boo

Kamarulzaman Hassan

Kamarulzaman Hassan

Personal information

Full name
Kamarulzaman bin Haji Hassan

Date of birth
(1979-01-17) 17 January 1979 (age 38)

Place of birth
Penang, Malaysia

Height
1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)

Playing position
Goalkeeper

Youth career

1998–1999
Penang President Cup

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

2000–2003
Penang

2004
Sarawak

2005–2006
Penang

2006–2007
Melaka

2007–2008
Proton FC

National team‡

1999–2001
Malaysia under-23

(0)

2000–2001
Malaysia
8
(0)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 28 February 2009.
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 31 August 2008

Kamarulzaman Hassan (born 17 January 1979) is a former Malaysian footballer. He is a former member of the Malaysian national team. Currently he works as assistant coach and goalkeeping coach in the Suruhanjaya Perkhidmatan Awam FC football team.

Contents

1 Career
2 National team
3 References
4 External links

Career[edit]
He spend his majority professional career at Penang FA, his birthplace football team. He also played with Malacca FA, Sarawak FA and Proton FC.
National team[edit]
Kamarulzaman represented the Malaysia national football team 8 times in 2000, during the height of his career. He made his debut during 2000 Tiger Cup in Thailand.[1] He also represents Malaysia national under-23 football team for the SEA Games.
He, along with Muhamad Khalid Jamlus and Azmin Azram Abdul Aziz, was dropped from the national squad in early 2001 for staying out late at a disco before the 2002 World Cup preliminary games against Qatar, Palestine and Hong Kong.[2]
Perhaps his infamous claim to fame occurs during the 2001 SEA Games in Malaysia, when the Malaysia under 23 team were in the final match against Thailand. With the pressure of winning the first gold medal in football since 1989 SEA Games, also in Malaysia, and in front on the home fans, Kamarulzaman, who until then were playing the best football of his career, made a grave mistake. A harmless cross from Sarawut Treephan, was deflected by Kamarulzaman who try to clear it, into the back of his own net. The goal, three minutes from full-time, proved to be the winning goal for Thailand.[3] Kamarulzaman, blamed for the Malaysia loss, never played for Malaysia again.
References[edit]

^ “Kamarulzaman cari pasukan baru (Kamarulzaman search for new team)”. SabahRhinos.net. 7 November 2006. Retrieved 31 July

Doping at the Tour de France

Spectators’ banner during the Tour de France 2006

Part of a series on

Doping in sport

Substances and types

Anabolic steroids
Blood doping
Gene doping
Cannabinoids
Diuretics
Painkillers
Sedatives
Stem cell doping
Stimulants
Beta2-adrenergic agonist
Clenbuterol
Ephedrine
EPO
Human growth hormone
Methylhexanamine
SARMs
Stanozolol
Tetrahydrogestrinone

Terminology

Abortion doping
Biological passport
Blood-spinning
Doping test
Performance-enhancing drugs
Repoxygen
Stem cell doping
Whizzinator

History

Olympics
Tour de France (1998, 1999, 2007)
BALCO scandal
Barry Bonds perjury case
Clemson University steroid scandal
U of South Carolina steroid scandal
Dubin Inquiry
Association Football
China
East Germany
Russia
Festina affair
Floyd Landis case
Game of Shadows
Juiced
History of Lance Armstrong allegations
Mitchell Report
Operación Puerto
Pittsburgh drug trials
Biogenesis baseball scandal
Steroid use in American football
Steroid use in baseball

Doping-related lists

Doping cases in Sport
Athletics
Cycling
Drugs banned from the Olympics
MLB players suspended for doping
MLB players in the Mitchell Report

Anti-doping bodies

World Anti-Doping Agency
List of national anti-doping organizations

Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority
French Anti-Doping Agency
National Anti-Doping Agency
Russian Anti-Doping Agency
UK Anti-Doping
United States Anti-Doping Agency

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There have been allegations of doping in the Tour de France since the race began in 1903. Early Tour riders consumed alcohol and used ether, among other substances, as a means of dulling the pain of competing in endurance cycling.[1] Riders began using substances as a means of increasing performance rather than dulling the senses, and organizing bodies such as the Tour and the International Cycling Union (UCI), as well as government bodies, enacted policies to combat the practice.
Use of performance-enhancing drugs in cycling predates the Tour de France. Cycling, having been from the start a sport of extremes, whether of speed by being paced by tandems, motorcycles and even cars, or of distance, the suffering involved encouraged the means to alleviate it. Not until after World War II were sporting or even particularly health issues raised. Those came shortly before the death of Tom Simpson in the Tour de France of 1967. Max Novich referred to the Tour de France in a 1973 issue of New York State Journal of Medicine as “a cycling nightma

Matudaea

Matudaea

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Plantae

(unranked):
Angiosperms

(unranked):
Eudicots

(unranked):
Core eudicots

Order:
Saxifragales

Family:
Hamamelidaceae

Genus:
Matudaea

Matudaea is a genus of plant in family Hamamelidaceae. It contains the following species (but this list may be incomplete):

Matudaea trinervia, Lundell

This Saxifragales-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Boomer and Carton

Boomer and Carton

Genre
Sports talk

Running time
4 hours
(6:00 – 10:00 a.m. ET)

Country
 United States

Language(s)
English

Home station
WFAN (2007-present)

TV adaptations
CBS Sports Network (2014–present)
MSG Network (2010–2013)

Starring
Boomer Esiason
Craig Carton

Recording studio
WFAN Studios in New York, NY

Air dates
since September 4, 2007

Website
Boomer and Carton Homepage

Boomer and Carton is a morning drive sports radio program on WFAN-AM and WFAN-FM in New York City. It is hosted by Boomer Esiason (former National Football League quarterback) and Craig Carton (formerly of The Jersey Guys). The show debuted on September 4, 2007.[1][2] The show was simulcast on MSG Network from September 14, 2010 through September 13, 2013, and began airing on CBS Sports Network on January 6, 2014.[3]

Contents

1 History
2 On-air

2.1 Carton walks across the Brooklyn Bridge in a Speedo
2.2 Brett the Jet
2.3 Regular segments
2.4 Recurring gags
2.5 Former topics and gags
2.6 Controversies

3 References
4 External links

History[edit]
In the wake of the shock jock Don Imus’ controversial comments in early 2007, CBS Radio fired the long time radio personality. From that point on, the 6:00 to 10:00 a.m. time slot was filled by various hosts to help fill the void left by the Imus firing. Charles McCord and Chris Carlin remained on all the replacement shows as assistance and staff, in similar roles as they were on Imus’s show, and the replacement shows continued to be syndicated via Westwood One. Mike Francesa and Chris Russo were the first to fill the spot, hosting for the two weeks (April 16–27) immediately after Imus’ firing. Francesa and Russo also worked the shift separate from each other, as did fellow WFAN staffers Richard Neer, Joe Benigno and Evan Roberts, and Carlin, who worked both alone and with co-hosts, notably Kim Jones and Washington Post sports columnist John Feinstein.
WFAN and Westwood One also brought in outside personalities into the slot. Among them were Boomer Esiason, David Gregory, Patrick McEnroe, Geraldo Rivera, Lou Dobbs, and Chicago sports radio host Mike North.[citation needed]
On September 4, 2007, Esiason took over as the permanent host of the WFAN morning show, with veteran radio personality Craig Carton serving as co-host. The new program is not distributed nationally by Westwood One. During the 2009 spring and summer ratings periods the program has finished in first place among men ages 25–54.
A